Saturday November 27 2021

Posted by BajaInsider on October 11, 2021
  • The Sea of Cortez remains deliciously warm into November
    The Sea of Cortez remains deliciously warm into November
  • Travel Alert Level by Mexican State
    Travel Alert Level by Mexican State

 

UPDATED 10/11/21 The threat of COVID-19 has diminished significantly, particularly in those traditional tourist destinations where the government accelerated the vaccination programs. 

US CDC Advisories on Travel to Mexico

Level 3: COVID-19 High

  • COVID-19 in MexicoJune 07, 2021Make sure you are fully vaccinated before traveling to Mexico. Unvaccinated travelers should avoid nonessential travel to Mexico.

COVID-19 and Cruise Ship Travel

  • COVID-19 and Cruise Ship TravelAugust 20, 2021CDC recommends that people who are not fully vaccinated avoid travel on cruise ships, including river cruises, worldwide.

 

Reconsider travel to Mexico due to COVID-19.

See state summaries and advisory levels below for information on your specific travel destination. Some areas of Mexico have increased risk of crime and kidnapping.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Mexico due to COVID-19, indicating a high level of COVID-19 in the country. Your risk of contracting COVID-19 and developing severe symptoms may be lower if you are fully vaccinated with an FDA authorized vaccine. Before planning any international travel, please review the CDC's specific recommendations for vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Mexico.

Country Summary: Violent crime – such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery – is widespread and common in Mexico. The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in many areas of Mexico, as travel by U.S. government employees to certain areas is prohibited or restricted. In many states, local emergency services are limited outside the state capital or major cities.

Restrictions on U.S. government travel: U.S. government employees may not travel between cities after dark, may not hail taxis on the street, and must rely on dispatched vehicles, including app-based services like Uber, and regulated taxi stands. U.S. government employees may not drive from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior parts of Mexico, with the exception of daytime travel within Baja California, between Nogales and Hermosillo on Mexican Federal Highway 15D, and between Nuevo Laredo and Monterrey on Highway 85D. U.S. government employees should avoid traveling alone, especially in remote areas.

Read the country information page.

Do Not Travel To:

Reconsider Travel To:

Exercise Increased Caution When Traveling To:

Exercise Normal Precautions When Traveling To:

If you decide to travel to Mexico:

  • See the U.S. Embassy's web page regarding COVID-19. 
  • Visit the CDC’s web page on Travel and COVID-19.   
  • Keep your traveling companions and family back home informed of your travel plans. If separating from your travel group, send a friend your GPS location. If taking a taxi alone, take a photo of the taxi number and/or license plate and text to a friend.
  • Use toll roads when possible and avoid driving alone or at night. In many states, police presence and emergency services are extremely limited outside the state capital or major cities.
  • Exercise increased caution when visiting local bars, nightclubs, and casinos.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Reports for Mexico.
  • Mariners planning travel to Mexico should check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts at  https://www.maritime.dot.gov/msci-alerts, which include instructions on reporting suspicious activities and attacks to Mexican naval authorities.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

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